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and unrelenting hypocrisy by congress. if we pass a budget, when we do that's what affects the debt ceiling. if you pass a budget and there's a trillion dollars that will be spent on iraq and you have no way to pay for it, the debt becomes due and you've got to pay that bill. so the debt ceiling has been abused frankly by both parties but in the past, it has been about hypocrisy and grandstanding. now it is actually about defaulting on our bills. so congressman nadler and i and others are saying hey look, it is time to be straight with the american people. if we vote for a budget that requires cuts or revenues, then at the moment we vote for the budge set when we have to take responsibility for the consequences. >> john: sir, yesterday in the president's press conference, he mentioned how an spp downgrade he blamed it on the republicans of congress. is the g.o.p. really willing to totally default on our obligations? it seems like they're weakening on that argument that the debt ceiling gives them leverage. "wall street journal," national review lisa merckowski, even john boehner seem to be
fiscal cliff fatigue it's now back to the doldrums of the debt ceiling debate, my friends. yes, unfortunately if you prefer your doomsday scenarios few and far between then washington, d.c. is no place for you. the newest wound that republicans in congress are considering inflicting upon ourselves and our fragile economy is defaulting on our financial obligations by refusing to raise the debt ceiling, something they agreed to rather effortlessly 25 times under george w. bush and ronald reagan. this would be the decision that would be only as disastrous as it is profoundly unnecessary. because the truth is, as president obama noted yesterday the u.s. economy's actually poised for a good year if only congress can get out of the way. i kind of paraphrased that last part. now that we know we're not going to be minting a trillion dollar coin, we need something different. a bill that would repeal the debt ceiling altogether. it is an idea supported publicly by alan greenspan and times man of the year last year, ben bernanke. it is an idea that could prevent lawmakers from lurching ou
: the new republicans in congress were threatening to vote against raising the debt ceiling. if congress didn't act by august 2, the federal government would be unable to pay its bills. >> in 2010, when all these republicans were running for congress, many of them avowed tea partiers and the rest of them riding the tea party wave, the subject of the impending debt ceiling came up frequently and virtually all of them campaigned saying... pledging not to raise the debt ceiling. >> narrator: early on, republican freshmen attended orientation sessions. republican strategist frank luntz ran one of them. >> and i asked the question, how many of you are going to vote for the debt ceiling? and only three or four of them raised their hands. and i said, if you vote for the debt ceiling, the people who put you in office are going to knock you out. >> if you vote for the debt ceiling, you're voting for your own death certificate, political death certificate. >> narrator: for his part, the president decided to try something new: personal politics. he figured he could connect to the republican leader,
raising the debt ceiling. jerry nadler, member of congress. what has changed. why were you against, in favor of keeping debt ceiling restraint then and not so now. >> it because it was meaningless gesture frankly. when you had a republican president and republican congress minority demagogued and said we'll vote against it knowing perfectly well it would pass. no one ever seriously tried to have it not pass. and when ever, we were in the majority, we, democrats we passed it, even in the bush administration. because you knew it had to pass. now i don't, i'm not trying to make any excuses for, for political demagoguery in the past but the fact is, the fact is what is knew that republicans seem serious about not raising the debt ceiling and that can throw the economy into real depression. david: what is new the degree of spending in this country we haven't really had before. >> that is not true. david: hold on a second. you hear a lot of people talk about numbers in the future. the president says i'm for reducing spending by so much trillion dollars. let's look at the numbers that hav
the debt ceiling, which congress has to do periodically, gives the government the ability to pay existing bills. it doesn't create new deficits. it doesn't create new spending. so not raising the debt ceiling is sort of like a family, which is trying to improve its credit rating sank i know how we can save money, we won't pay off credit card bills. not the most effective way to improve your credit rating. it was the very slow solution to the debt ceiling in august 2011 i got the u.s. downgraded last time. so it's very, very important that all these issues are important but it's very, very important that congress take necessary action to raise the debt ceiling to avoid a situation where our government doesn't pay its bills. >> a number of people have expressed concern about how much of the challenges actually were addressed in the deal. as you mention it certainly went part way but it leaves another the issues still on the table, and additional negotiations and are looking. would you characterize that as an additional clip that is facing us, or do you think that it's not as concerning as i
out of the debt ceiling without having congress make the decision themselves. do you think that's right to put the ball in the court of the republican house caucus and said you guys have the choice. are you going to raise it or cause a default and deal with those economic consequences? >> i don't know if it's the right strategy. i wish he had not ruled out the 14th amendment or the coin. he is betting that the republican party is not completely insane. i hope that's a good bet. i'm not sure it is. what the republicans are doing is saying that's a nice economy. like a 1930s gangster movie. that's a nice economy. pity if it blows up if you don't pay me off with what i want. that's a direct threat and the hostage is the entire economy. we will default and if we default, we will have a depression. a real depression and the interest rates will spike on every public and private loan. we will have a mass unemployment like now. now. i love the mafia analogies. keep it up. the sandy relief bill. this is not supposed to be politicized. 179 republicans in the house vote against it includin
the debt ceiling and the two sides are as far apart as they ever been. democrats say congress routinely increases debt ceiling. it allows the federal government to pay for spending it already approved. they say deficit reduction is different argument and they're now proposing eliminating the debt ceiling. >> we must not permit an artificial debt ceiling to throw the country into default and our economy into chaos and depression which is exactly what the republicans are threatening to do. it is time to abolish the debt ceiling and our levels of taxation and spending will be set as they always have been by congressional action. >> republicans argue washington has linked several increase in the debt ceiling to deficit reduction deals. it serves as reminder how much the government has borrowed. senate minority leader mitch mcconnell writes, over the past three decades in fact u.s. presidents and lawmakers from both parties routinely used the debt limit debate to reform government spending. washington democrats under pressure from their favored interest groups continue to adhere to an outdat
. if congress does fail to lift the debt ceiling by late february, the treasury department has to cover about 450 billion-dollars. in obligations. about 450 billion. revenue at that point, $2 77 billion. essentially the government will be able to cover about 60% of its bill. 60% of its bills, treasury would make the interest payments on the debt that could is about 40 billion. okay? just for debt, we could still pay up social security benefits, they account for about 61 billion-dollars. and we could still pay veterans and our military, that would cost $17 billion for the military and for veterans. that is still only $118 billion of that $2 17. $118 billion. i want to ask you. why would anyone not be appalled by a president saying what he just did? implying there would not be adequate money to take care of social security obligations during that period. imply its would not be up to him to make a decision, which would prevent our social security recipients from worrying about such a thing. these -- this is not the stuff of which this president wants to be remembered. this president liked to pe
. before we turn to the debt ceiling, i would like your reactions to the president's proposals to curb gun violence and whether you think those legislative proposals that he made have a chance of getting through either house of congress or both. >> i do. i mean, all of us are just astonished and appalled at what happened in newtown and the idea that a 6-year-old child would have 11 high capacity bullet designed by the military for combat pumped into that little child is really changing the discussion here. so i think the focus on practical things like high capacity magazines, like background checks that work, like trying to come up with appropriate assault weapon ban, these all make sense. and then his executive authority to make certain that laws we have on the books against gun trafficking are actively and aggressively enforced, i think those are practical suggestions. a lot of debate but a new day here. >> congressman, let's move on to another hot topic debate and that is the debt ceiling raise. you have been one of several democratic congress members to say that the president should en
collins of maine saying the debt ceiling is going to have to be raised. even the coch brothers don't want to allow debt default. the president of americans for prosperity says they're advising members of congress. focusing on the debt ceiling makes the message more difficult. so we're starting to see some kind of responsible leadership. this is just going too far. >> and newt gingrich agrees with that sentiment, as well. i think what you're going to see is more folks, you know, a chamber of commerce republicans, folks from the business community i think are really going to start speaking up as this debt ceiling starts to loom closer in the middle of february. when it really reaches its limit, you'll have some pressure from the corporate community really bearing down on the house gop to get something done. so i think that's one of the things that's going to happen. it could be that they delay these spending cuts in talking about them either around the sequestration or around the time when they have to renew the continueing resolution to fund the government. this is what they've been talkin
of reaching the debt ceiling, yet both sides seems locked in congress are not going to talk about the debt ceiling. speaker boehner says it can't be done unless we cut spending at the same time. so having watched this for more than 30 years in congress, what are the odds of avoiding going over the cliff given were both parties are? >> the odds are that we won't do it. it's a matter of faith. it's a matter of consequence. i mean, those who say okay, let's toy with that, they are toying with the american economy and they are toying with the global economy. and so, i think it is somewhat -- it seems great to talk about to the ninth, but the closer you get to that class, the less likely it is that you'll find the u.s. over it. the mac for me ask one other in the loco to grind out third start. he told "politico" last week that a balanced approach replacing the sequesters spending cuts and revenue should accelerate tax refund is fully possible this year for work and by person basis. does that square with people estate tax reform is going to because of scheduling. need to do with the limits of ku
may be sending a message to our gridlocked congress of the debt ceiling debate. do your job or will do it for you. >> if the house and the senate want to give me the authority so that they don't have to take these tough votes, if they want to put the responsibility on me to raise the debt ceiling and happily take it, but if they want to keep this responsibility than they need to go ahead and get it done. gerri: if they don't can the president by passed the congress using the 14th amendment? for a corrupted by former federal prosecutor joins us. read this so that people can get a sense of what it says. the validity of the public debt of the united states authorized by law including pensions and bounties for services in suppressing insurrection or rebellion should not be questioned. it sounds pretty dramatic. >> the 14th amendment, we all remember from high-school kamal is a reconstruction of manila in 1868 after the civil war to plan the most abortive things that it did was granted full citizenship to african-americans, thus overruling the dread scott case. gerri: but that's the word ta
rid of the debt ceiling. most countries don't have a debt ceiling. you still need votes from congress to authorize spending. you couldn't just borrow willy nilly anyway. the simple fact is the debt ceiling is the one time in the legislative process where you actually get a bill. everyone having all this contest of whose analogy is right, whether it's a family with a budget, whether it's this. or that, whether it's dining and dashing as the president likes to say. the debt ceiling is the moment you get the credit card bill and it's the only moment. and if you can't have a sort of reckoning about your spending habits when you see your credit card bill you're never going to have that reckoning. i'm in favor of it. i'm in favor of any speed bumps towards more spending and this is as good as any. jon: the president was talking about it at his news conference the other day. i want to play something that he had to say and get your reaction. >> if congressional republicans refuse to pay america's bills on time, social security checks and veteran's benefits will be delayed. we might not be abl
this fight? >> this is not a necessary fight. this situation created by congress which sent the debt ceiling from years ago in hopes it would impose some discipline but of course it hasn't because it has been raised and raised and raised and now it is a source of a contentious debate that is still raised, and so it is unnecessary. what we need to do in the u.s. is for the two sides to get together to come up with a comprehensive debt and deficit reduction plan. the debt ceiling and all around it doesn't really solve the problem. it is a waste of time. adam: let me interrupt you because we have had this debt ceiling essentially part of our discussion for almost 100 years, going back to 1917 with the issue of liberty bonds. now today we talk about the debt ceiling and we talk about its impact, this debate for the people who are watching, and, getting to this craziness we see the market reacting in a way you can't anticipate. what would happen to our 401(k) if congress he said they have to get together, i was thinking two words, "good luck." whether they can't do something? >> if they don't rai
of congress who has broken ranks on the big stupid debt ceiling thing. in 2011, there was not a single republican in congress in the house or in the senate who broke ranks publicly and said actually, purposefully driving the american economy into a ditch to make a point that even we don't understand and that is against the constitution, that might not be a great idea. nobody broke ranks when the republicans did this in 2011. nobody on the republican side. but today on the republican side somebody did. today republican senator lisa murkowski of alaska broke ranks. she gave an interview to her hometown newspaper in alaska, she says she disagrees threatening the country with default. quote, murkowski is breaking rank, saying the country has a duty to assure it pays its bills. murkowski said not all of her colleagues in the senate will say it out loud, but she believes most agree that failing to raise the debt limit would harm perception of the country. quote, if you incur an obligation, you have a responsibility to pay for that, murkowski said. time is going the tell if lisa murkowski is
that the united states could lose its top credit ceiling if the debt ceiling is not raised. timothy geithner has warned congress they'll reach that limit as early as next month. >>> asian markets plummetled ahead of key economic data. it plummeted more than 2.5% while hong kong's hang sang lost a fraction. >>> stocks ended mixed on wall street over the uncertainty of the nation's debt limit. the dow finished the day up more than 27 points while the nasdaq fell nearly 7 points. >>> shoppers spent more this holiday season than last but not as much as experts predicted. sales rose 3%, falling short of the national retail federation's forecast of 4.1%. many stores heavily marked down merchandise in the final shopping days to lure in shoppers who held back on spending. still, retailers hauled $580 million in november and december. >>> walmart says it will buy u.s.-made goods over the next decade. the retail giant is also pledging to offer a job to any honorably discharged american veteran within a year of active duty. walmart expects to hire a thousand veterans in the next five
't seen a lot of engagement with congress yet. the debt ceiling somewhere between february 15th and the end of february, early march. we don't know quite exactly where it will be. we don't know whether john boehner and the republican house will look him in the eye and say we are not doing anything. it's a mystery right now. >> in fact, politico reported this week over housealf of house republicans say they are willing to shut the government down if they don't get the spending cuts that they are demanding as a price for raising the debt ceiling. >> that is what they are saying. it's still far enough out so that it could all be posturing. even if i accept it -- and i do -- that half of the house members actually believe that as we get closer, as the pressure builds, corporate executives will start calling the republican leadership and saying you can't really do this. there will be some who waiver. there has been one republican senator who has wavered and you will begin to see fissures and something will happen inside the negotiation. i hate to see we have
credit status if there's a delay in raising the debt ceiling. the federal government is expected to exceed its borrowing limit by march, unless congress acts. if fitch does downgrade u.s. debt, it would join standard and poor's, which took that action in 2011 during the last debt ceiling debate. the u.s. house moved to pass a hurricane sandy relief bill this evening. $17 billion would go for immediate recovery in the affected northeastern states. another $33 billion is for long- term spending. some republicans argued that much of the money isn't for emergency relief at all. california's tom mcclintock called for stripping that funding out. >> according to the congressional budget office, more than 90% of this money won't even be spent this year. that's not emergency relief. $16 billion is to quintuple the size of the community development block grant program. that's the slush fund that pays for such dubious projects as doggie day care centers and doesn't even have to be spent in the hurricane area. >> sreenivasan: other republican >> sreenivasan: other republicans joined with mos
to direct treasury to prioritize debt payments if congress doesn't raise the debt ceiling. >>> and president obama will unveil his gun control plan today at 11:45 eastern. he's expected to call on congress to ban military-style assault weapons and the type of high-capacity ammunition used in last month's school shooting in newtown, connecticut. the package will also include efforts to stop school bullying and invest available mental health services. may include several steps the president can take right away without congressional approval. >>> the house of representatives has passed more than $50 billion in aid for hurricane sandy victims. this more than ten weeks after the storm ravaged the northeastern u.s. the vote was 241-180. several republicans voted no. conservatives failed to offset part of the bill's cost with across-the-board federal spending cuts as some had wanted. the senate is likely to accept the measure and send it to president obama to sign next week. >>> and japan's top two carriers, ana and japan airlines, have granted all their boeing 787s today and tomorrow. it's after o
run out of money to pay its bills by the end of february if that debt ceiling isn't raised. congress is preparing to debate it, but it could be a politically charged battle. >>> all right. a big political comeback getting underway today. you might remember former south carolina governor mark sanford. well, back in 2009 he admitted to having an affair with a woman from argentina, who is now his fiance. he announced he's running for his old congressional seat. >>> all right. and you don't hear a story like this often. it comes to us from the suburbs of stockholm, sweden. that's where a cleaning lady stole an empty commuter train and drove it into an apartment building. >> she was at the controls for about a mile. then the train derailed before hitting the building. the woman was seriously injured. she was the only person hurt. i guess she was the only one on the train. >> not good. what were you thinking? >> i wonder why she did that. >> i don't know. >> we need more information on that one. >> yeah, we do. >>> let's talk about our wednesday weather. heavy rain from the gulf coast into
called on congress to raise the debt ceiling. he said the u.s. can avoid defaulting on its day. the dean and the university's ford school of public policy moderates this discussion. this is just over an hour. >> thank you very much. it is also my great pleasure to welcome all of you here today, and on the half of the gerald r. to ford school of public policy, the university of michigan is extremely honored to welcome the honorable ben bernanke, chairman of the board of governors of the federal reserve system. today's conversation is the latest in a series of distinguished lectures, "policy talks @ the ford school." we are so pleased that susan white could introduce today's event and we're also very pleased to have president mary sue coleman with us today, as was regions american nelson and power, who were already mentioned to you. we also have several of the university executive officers and deans. and i would like to welcome all of them to thank them for joining us today. while it's an honor and truly a personal pleasure for me to introduce our special guest, as the central bank of the
journal this morning as well. two members of congress. continuing with the debt ceiling, the financial times this morning reports -- on the nomination of chuck hagel, a former nebraskahe ka senator.m he won the support of two key members. his opposition so far has come almost entirely from fellow republicans. those are some of the headlines this morning in the papers. back to our question, do you support executive action on gun- control measures? now to an independent caller. caller: hi. i just wonder if there are any human beings left. the underlying issue has very little to do with politics. considering what just recently happened and why everybody is talking about gun-control. gun-control does not mean eradication of the second amendment. do people expect our president to do nothing about thit? it seems like every time people talk about guns, is such a sensitive issue. there are more sensitive issues, kids growing up in poverty, and being exposed to all these elements, degeneration getting worse and worse. those are the real sensitive issues. when you talk about guns and gun control
. >> guest: retreat from the idea of using the debt ceiling. >> host: you referenced a "wall street journal" article that some in g.o.p. don't pay all the bills now. if we were to -- if the congress were not to raise the debt ceiling, some republicans believe such an event would be manageable in the short run, at least, they say, they won't vote for a higher debt ceiling until democrats accept spending cuts. many see this as risky. one said tuesday he would introduce legislation next week instructing the white house to prioritize the government's bills. what's wrong with the idea? >> guest: two things. first of all, we've had some deficit reduction. the president laid out a couple days ago. we had over $2 # trillion. we had a trillion and a half that came from previous actions, and then we added just a few days ago some further deficit reduction through increased taxes on the very wealthy of this country. we already begun to undertake deficit reduction. to use that as a reason to use the debt ceiling as a weapon is really playing with fire. they say pay some bills and not pay others. we've
the debt ceiling. that would make it such a dangerous option for going forward. >> i think our credit rating would go down. and how would we pay the bills? how would we pay social security points how will we pay veterans? [inaudible] >> the republicans are saying pick and choose. and so, let's have a vote here, which ones would repair it? which one would not occur right away? i mean, the president was right to say, in my judgment, to the republicans, don't do it. you are playing with fire. >> wife? i don't understand i guess. why are they playing with fire? what would happen? >> those are two different questions. the republicans have some idea what would happen. we've been through this with the credit rating and i think essentially they would know what would have been instead they say let's pick and choose. by the way, they haven't said which they would pick and which would be left aside. the president made clear, we are not talking about future expenses spared were talking about paying for what the congress has voted. pick and choose this something that is that this point theoretical
's sleep ♪ >>> president obama struggling with the debt ceiling, that's always a fun comedy premise. wow. this will be good. debt premise. no, president obama told congress it must raise our debt limit because the u.s. is, quote, not a deadbeat nation. yeah. and the president added, by the way, if china calls, i'm not here. >> conan o'brien poking fun at the latest financial crisis. comedians, of course, joking about it. the country's debt, one of the big issues facing the president over the next four years. alison kosik is taking an in-depth look at how we got there and why it is important to do something about it. >> reporter: the challenge? taming the national debt. just a few steps from the billboards of times square is a billboard of a certain sort. the national debt clock. new york real estate developer seymour durst set up the first debt clock in 1989. >> when my father designed the clock, the debt was about $2 trillion. he would be shocked that we're at this number today. >> reporter: last year, the federal government spent $3.6 trillion, but it only took in $2.45 trillion in rev
is larry lindsey giving his clients as the country approaches the debt ceiling. we find out when we come back. >>> plus earnings still to come from goldman sachs, reaction from chris whalen, back to analyze the numbers with us. jacque wi "squawk" will be right back. >>> comments, questions? send them to cnbc on twitter. send them to becky, joe, andrew and the "squawk" staff. i got this snapshot thing from progressive, plugged it into my car, and got a discount just for being the good driver i've always been. i'm just out here, snap-shooting it forward. you don't want to have to pay for other people's bad driving, do you? no. with progressive snapshot, you don't have to. i'm going to snap it right now. bam, there it is. goes underneath your dash. keep safe, and keep saving. you know, i won't always be around to save you money. that's why you should get snapshot from progressive. all right, dude! thanks! to the safe go the savings. stamps >>> welcome back to "squawk box." futures lowered, a lot lowered by 53 points. and jpmorgan, $1.39 per share. that was the beat but if you exclude value
. the and the debt ceiling is a restraint. what the democrats want is a blank check. i'm not sure it's constitutional because congress rules on the issue of money, not the executive branch. so, i'm not sure the constitutionality of it. if you did abolish this debt ceiling, you would pretty soon get yourself a downgrade. these rating agencies would say, your debt is just running away. you're not credit worthy. >> megyn: the debt ceiling is in place, it doesn't seem they trust our lawmakers to live within their moneys and with the money. when you look at 16.4 trillion, they're right, we're not living in our means. and there's a question, stu, you see that number, i think of my kids and think of my children. who is going to pay that number? it's probably not going to be me. >> right. >> megyn: it's probably going to be my kids. >> look, for what is it, 238 years america's had a principle, we sacrifice today for the benefit of our children in the future. you remove that debt ceiling and you totally reversed that financial principle. what you're saying is, we will make our children pay in the future for t
spending in the the next eight weeks to get something through congress. >> sean: quick question. >> which is what we need to do. >> sean: what wok so bad if the republicans said we're not going to raise the debt ceiling unless there's significant cuts. >> that should be the opening position. >> sean: then you have them cave? >> there has to be-- >> you two are hard to take seriously in your jeans, stuart varney is wearing a sport coat and-- it's not a suit and thrown my whole world upsidedown. >> sean: he's got lighter jeans. >> flat-out changed the subject. >> i learned that somewhere. >> sean: dodge. >> shift in position. >> sean: you say sage bob beckel "the five". >> did you not to that. tune in every day at five. >> sean: i watch the show. i love you both, goodbye, thank you. coming up, you are looking at, four of the president's key cabinet appointments. do you notice any similarities there? the press did and seems the champion of women's rights has failed to name any women to these posts. we're going to look at the lack of diversity in the president's changing administration. by th
and future generations. the president has said, ", if congress is going to tie the debt ceiling votes, which we have never done in our history, i will not play that game. the president needs to have somebody around him that knows the truth. that poor man is being lied to. all you have to do is look back in our history. every cut -- every time there was a cut in spending, it was often tied to the debt ceiling negotiations. go back to 1985, to 1990, 1993, 1997, 2010. speaker pelosi, in 2010, with president obama, tied a pay-go provision. she did it. why is it so wrong that the republicans want to do that in the house, like speaker pelosi did? let's get responsible. but the president doesn't even remember two years ago when speaker pelosi did that. somebody has got to help this poor man understand recent and distant history before the rating agencies say, you know what? we used to think the rule of law was going to help the u.s. economy and help the federal government get around to taking care of its debts, but these guys don't even follow the rule of law anymore. and as far as what the economi
've seen the near future in how the republicans end up agreeing to a debt ceiling raise without a battle. government funding and government shutdown, different story. >>> let's turn back to the big story of the day. and that is the president's push on guns and the coming fight with both congress and the nra. in addition to calling on congress to pass gun control legislation, the president will propose a set of executive actions. nbc's justice correspondent pete williams is here to help explain some of those executive actions. a big one that we know he's going to call for is this idea, pete, of basically ordering the justice department to prosecute people that fail background checks. explain why that hasn't been done before, and how it can be done. >> sure, first of all. the federal law makes it a crime for somebody to falsify, knowingly falsify information to their background checks, saying that they're qualified to have a gun when they're not. presumably, most people know when they've been dishonorably discharged from the military, whether they have the felony conviction, whether they h
to an unusual ground. debt ceiling, gun control, fiscal cliff. but then a reporter asked about the criticism that the president is too insular, doesn't socialize enough. >> most people who know me know i'm a pretty friendly guy. and i like a good party. >> there's sometimes a disconnect with some people. anybody who gets to know president obama, finds him to be just like a normal and fun. >> reporter: presidential historian and cbs news consultant douglas brinkley says there's a reason the president hasn't connected with congress. >> things have changed in washington. characters like ted kennedy who used to be able to be friends with the opposition are gone. he just hasn't been able to find that special bond like ronald reagan had with tip o'neill on capitol hill. >> reporter: the president reminded reporters on monday he did play a friendly round of golf with house speaker john boehner in 2011. >> i like speaker boehner personally. when we went out and played golf, we had a great time. >> reporter: but mr. obama was quick to add it didn't help to solve the budget imp
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)